Saturday, December 08, 2007

for the benefit of mr. seal

we were setting up a shot this morning when some of the crew started wondering off down the beach, saying there's a seal down there. that's cool, since we haven't had a chance to see a lot of ocean fauna here, but brian and i were working on the shot. then someone added that the seal was on the beach.
we've paid to come to hawaii, we may as we see the seal.
and, sure enough, around the bend there was a big, real seal, lying there on the sand. he [she?] was quite a ways from water and had one eye closed. there were no tracks from him to the water, signifying that he'd been here for quite a while. it didn't take a marine biologist to see that we had a beached seal here.
what do you do? that's a big mammal, but i suppose enough of us could maybe roll him back out. as one of the actors got near him, he barked. we were all keeping a good ten feet between us and the sea creature, fascinated but cautious. matt the actor, for whatever reason, began running circles in the sand in front of mr. seal. he didn't like this and began barking at him some more. matt kept running and the seal lifted his head in irritation. alright, the seal can at least move. i think matt enjoyed getting the reaction, as he continued to run around. evidently this really ticked off the seal, because he was barking as he flopped himself around and back out to the ocean. turns out we didn't save his life; we ruined his quiet time.

4 comments:

Becky said...

It sounds like you should have had a marine biologist there to tell you that the seal wasn't beached, he was just relaxing. But I like the story anyway.

Brian, Stephanie, Whitney, and Taylor said...

This story made my day. Thanks man!

Tim said...

I don't think seals get beached very often, what with that ability to move around on land and not having to be wet all the time.

~Bekahjo said...

If you ever want to see a whole group of seals, go to La Jolla Cove in San Diego. It used to be a children's pool when I was little, but the wild seals basically took it over. There's almost always between 20-50 of them.